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World Environment Day Celebrations at Adelaide Botanic Garden

MM at WED

World Environment Day is the United Nation’s most important day for encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the protection of our environment.

Since 1996, Adelaide Botanic Garden has hosted tens of thousands of South Australian school students as well as their teachers and caregivers at what is now the state’s largest World Environment Day event.

On June 5 2017, three thousand Reception (Prep) to Year 7 students were greeted with perfect weather and participated in a range of interactive environmental presentations covering important topics from Aboriginal tools for living, preserving endangered species and native bees and spiders, through to worms and compost, food security and feral invaders.

The 35 presenters on the day were a combination of Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium staff, the SA Seed Conservation Centre, Garden Guides as well as external presenters such as Sea Shepherd, NRM Education, SA Museum, authors, Biosecurity, Cleland Wildlife Park and Adelaide Zoo.

World Environment Day at Adelaide Botanic Gardens continues to be a highly successful every year and schools add this as a regular feature to their annual calendar.

For more information about our event, do not hesitate to contact Education Coordinator Aaron Harrison:

aaron.harrison@sa.gov.au

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Stewardship of Endemic Endangered Species Project – Botanic Gardens of South Australia

Baby Boomers have been arguably the most impactful of generations for the earth’s environment.

But what of the current generation of young people still at school?

What is their awareness of conservation and of the natural environment?

If the Mission Australia’s Youth Surveys* are observed, it would appear the environment is not even on their radar. Perhaps global warming is just too big and too hard for the average year 9 student to feel as though they can make a difference, after all it appears that their elders can’t manage to do so…….

What are the opportunities for them to become involved in and passionate about conservation were they feel as though their efforts do make a difference?

SEEDS is a program that gives them the opportunity and the passion. A collaboration between the Seed Conservation Centre of SA, the SA Seed Bank, schools and students called SEEDS (Stewardship of Endemic Endangered Species) is doing just that.

Real science, real conservation and real passion.

Stewards of today – Environmentalists of tomorrow.

The aims of the SEEDS Project is to:

  • increase students and teachers knowledge and awareness of environmental stewardship
  • provide an opportunity for students to be involved in direct conservation
  • involve students with scientists and effective science as part of STEM and to also raise awareness of the broader community regarding plant conservation.

Environmentally, we are seeing direct benefits to threatened species conservation, increased knowledge that may further assist threatened species recovery strategies, engagement of school communities in environmental stewardship and support plant recovery programs.

Further information click here

 

In securing the future of the planet, we secure happiness for ourselves. One of the aims of the Greens is to turn around the tide of pessimism amongst the young people of the world.

Bob Brown

 

* Footnote – The 2013 Mission Australia Annual Survey of Young People shows the Environment has dropped as an identified major issue from 37% in 2011 to 11.7% in 2014. Perhaps it is because the only thing young people are empowered to do about environmental issues is to put the rubbish in the correct bin and turn off the tap when they clean their teeth!

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Pizza Plants – kids trail

Pizza plantsAs part of our current display (which is all about which plants are in our food), we’ve put together a garden trail for kids.
The pizza plants trail is designed to encourage children and families to grow simple plants at home that can then be used as tasty pizza toppings. We have a trail guide that can be picked up at our visitor centre, and then a series of signs in our edible garden and herb garden highlighting the relevant plants and their uses.
Kids are then also encouraged to pick up an envelope of beetroot seeds to grow at home once they have completed the trail.
Garden trails are very popular here at the Auckland Botanic Gardens, and we have printed 5000 copies to be distributed over the three month period of the theme.

Pizza plants inner
Inner page of the Pizza Plants kids trail – including map, list of plants to check as they find them and colouring in.
Pizza plants back
Front and back pages of the kids trail – the A4 sheet is folded twice times to form a DLE.
trail sign
Example of a trail sign that can be found in the garden as part of the pizza plants trail. Signs are 600mm in diameter and printed on ACM which can be reskinned for subsequent use.
Posted in Botanic Garden, guided walk, Uncategorized

afterDark @ the ANBG

By Kate Adams, Visitor Experience Co-ordinator, Australian National Botanic Garden

There is always something new and exciting to do at the Australian National Botanic Gardens. Our afterDARK programs are great fun for the whole family and over the Spring season many visitors enjoyed our Scavenger Hunts.  Families gathered for a night-time botanical scavenger hunt and by following clues they discovered treasures and treats while learning about our fantastic plant, animal and insect life.

spotlighting

Scavenger Hunts

We have a summer of fun and exciting activities planned for our visitors including Sunset Cinema, the annual Summer Sounds Concert Series and Luminous Botanicus III. Join us and enjoy one of the many great events on offer this summer. For more details check out the What’s On at http://www.parksaustralia.gov.au/botanic-gardens/do/whats-on.html