Posted in Botanic Garden, Interpretation, school holiday programme

Science and Art

 

As with any Botanic Gardens, we offer a wide range of educational activities across a variety of age ranges. Some are more successful and/or popular than others. When you look at the community education activities that are most popular – regardless of age – odds on they include a blend of art and science.

Despite popular opinion that one is either an arty person or a science nerd, there has long been a close association between the two disciplines. Both art and science are ways in which humans investigate and explore their environment in an attempt to understand and describe the world around us. Scientists and artists may use different methodologies and appeal to different audiences, but the motivations and goals are essentially the same.

In fact, science and art has a long history of successful collaboration. The ancient Greek word for art was techne, from which the words technique and technology are derived—terms that are equally applicable to both scientific and artistic practices. Continue reading “Science and Art”

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Posted in Uncategorized

World Environment Day Celebrations at Adelaide Botanic Garden

MM at WED

World Environment Day is the United Nation’s most important day for encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the protection of our environment.

Since 1996, Adelaide Botanic Garden has hosted tens of thousands of South Australian school students as well as their teachers and caregivers at what is now the state’s largest World Environment Day event.

On June 5 2017, three thousand Reception (Prep) to Year 7 students were greeted with perfect weather and participated in a range of interactive environmental presentations covering important topics from Aboriginal tools for living, preserving endangered species and native bees and spiders, through to worms and compost, food security and feral invaders. Continue reading “World Environment Day Celebrations at Adelaide Botanic Garden”

Posted in Professional Development

You’re invited! Come to the BGEN workshop at the BGANZ 2017 Congress

BGANZ congress

The BGANZ Congress is just around the corner! If you haven’t registered yet, don’t delay, it’s going to be a great event.

The BGEN committee invites you to an interactive BGEN workshop on Monday 23 October at 4.15pm. If you are involved in the areas of education, interpretation, visitor and public programs, outreach and community engagement, and adult learning this workshop is for you. You’ll get to meet fellow botanic garden educators and share best practice, get excellent ideas and inspiration, and learn why BGEN is a valuable forum for sharing experiences and resources.

The workshop will be collaborative and high-energy, you’ll leave inspired with new ideas and new connections. Bring along examples of projects and ideas you’d like to share and we’ll learn from each other.

If you’d like to know more about the BGEN workshop ahead of the Congress, please contact Julia Watson, BGEN convenor: julia.watson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

Posted in Professional Development

NZAEE 8th Biennial Conference: An Ecosystem for Environmental Education

NZAEENZAEE (the New Zealand Association for Environment Education) promotes environmental education initiatives at both a national and regional level in New Zealand.

Join the NZAEE conference in April 2018, and see their call for abstracts below:

Wednesday 18 – Friday 20 April 2018

Wellington Girls College, Wellington, New Zealand

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS Continue reading “NZAEE 8th Biennial Conference: An Ecosystem for Environmental Education”

Posted in school holiday programme

Native Plant Survival Challenge

Learn about native plants while you have fun!

A great school holiday programme activity is a native plant survival challenge. We simply pick a selection of specific native plants (or print some photos of certain ones if we can’t get hold of  them e.g. flowers or fruit depending on the time of the year). These native plants are laid out on a table, and kids with their families have to match which plants are used for which activities in the bush. E.g. Rangiora leaves (Brachiglottis) is used as toilet paper – which as you can imagine the kids love to learn.

Native plant survival challengeWe set up six sets of the same activity to handle large numbers of people.

native plant challenge layout

At the end of the challenge, kids are encouraged to draw a picture of what they would take into the bush, which we then add to a portfolio they leave with us, or take home with them.

Kids and parents alike love learning about how useful native plants are, and always enjoy this activity as a family. It’s simple, cheap (we created the cards once and use them repeatedly) and a wonderful way to enthuse visitors about plants.

Posted in Uncategorized

Stewardship of Endemic Endangered Species Project – Botanic Gardens of South Australia

Baby Boomers have been arguably the most impactful of generations for the earth’s environment.

But what of the current generation of young people still at school?

What is their awareness of conservation and of the natural environment?

If the Mission Australia’s Youth Surveys* are observed, it would appear the environment is not even on their radar. Perhaps global warming is just too big and too hard for the average year 9 student to feel as though they can make a difference, after all it appears that their elders can’t manage to do so…….

What are the opportunities for them to become involved in and passionate about conservation were they feel as though their efforts do make a difference?

SEEDS is a program that gives them the opportunity and the passion. A collaboration between the Seed Conservation Centre of SA, the SA Seed Bank, schools and students called SEEDS (Stewardship of Endemic Endangered Species) is doing just that.

Real science, real conservation and real passion.

Stewards of today – Environmentalists of tomorrow.

The aims of the SEEDS Project is to:

  • increase students and teachers knowledge and awareness of environmental stewardship
  • provide an opportunity for students to be involved in direct conservation
  • involve students with scientists and effective science as part of STEM and to also raise awareness of the broader community regarding plant conservation.

Environmentally, we are seeing direct benefits to threatened species conservation, increased knowledge that may further assist threatened species recovery strategies, engagement of school communities in environmental stewardship and support plant recovery programs.

Further information click here

 

In securing the future of the planet, we secure happiness for ourselves. One of the aims of the Greens is to turn around the tide of pessimism amongst the young people of the world.

Bob Brown

 

* Footnote – The 2013 Mission Australia Annual Survey of Young People shows the Environment has dropped as an identified major issue from 37% in 2011 to 11.7% in 2014. Perhaps it is because the only thing young people are empowered to do about environmental issues is to put the rubbish in the correct bin and turn off the tap when they clean their teeth!

Posted in Botanic Garden, Interpretation

Who Did That? Children’s Trail

Who did that intro signHungry caterpillar signTree spinning wheel_Page_1

There are many facets to a botanic gardens. Visitors enjoy the beauty and tranquillity of the outdoor space and engaging with the plant displays. Children like to explore for plants and animals that inhabit a garden.

To cater for a child’s inquisitive mind the Australian National Botanic Gardens has recently opened a children’s trails – Who Did That? The trail uses animal models and interactive signage to explore the relationship between animals and plants.

The trail was developed by Gardens’ Visitor Services Ranger Katy Penman and features beautiful artwork and poetry created by Katy. Examples of Katy’s artwork and words can be seen in accompanying images. The use of original artwork is a highlight of this trail.

We hope you get the chance to enjoy the Who Did That? children’s trail.