Posted in BGANZ, Botanic Garden, engagement

Resources to use for the 2018 Botanic Gardens Day

On Sunday 27 May 2018, 70 gardens across Australasia will be celebrate the important plant conservation work done across the network.

There is a wonderful range of engagement activities planned – see the list here.

There are some great resources to use such as Social Media headers, talking points, website headers, email signatures, and a media release template for you to help promote your events – as well as a dedicated hashtag #BGANZDay.

bg day
Use the Botanic Gardens Day header on your Facebook page to showcase the day

You can also share the Botanic Gardens Day video produced specifically for the event to help you advertise your activities – the more you share, the greater the engagement for the Botanic Gardens Day!

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Posted in Botanic Garden, school holiday programme

Conservation-themed school holiday programme

Autumn school holidays are nearly upon us in New Zealand (14-29 April) and here at the Auckland Botanic Gardens we’ve put together a series of free conservation-themed activities for kids (to match our overall conservation theme that runs until July).

We’ve worked with a graduate student, our visitor services team, volunteers and an external contractor to put together  and deliver the programme, and look forward to engaging with all the families that attend.

Advertising for the programme is through our local community newspaper, online, social media, email newsletter lists and posters on site. This is traditionally very effective for us, and the advertising cost is practically $0.

Here is the overall programme – leave a comment if you’d like more details or an explanation of how we are running these activities. And let us know what you are planning for the upcoming school holidays!

School holiday poster_Autumn 2018

Posted in blog

Making engagement easy

How do we make it easy for our visitors to know about the range of  activities they can do at our gardens? Sometimes visitors are simply not aware of all that is on offer, despite a range of signs, posters or info boards.

We have found that listing even simple activities can help visitors make the most of their time at the garden. For example, during our three-month dinosaur events, we produced a ‘7 Dinosaurus things to do’ flyer which was a hit with families. While there were  posters, signs, staff and guides, the way we ‘bundled’ all that was on offer into one simple flyer (almost like a menu to choose from) was very successful.

Something this simple can help new visitors overcome overwhelm, and provide suggestions on how to best enjoy a visit.

7 things to do

 

Posted in school holiday programme

Native Plant Survival Challenge

Learn about native plants while you have fun!

A great school holiday programme activity is a native plant survival challenge. We simply pick a selection of specific native plants (or print some photos of certain ones if we can’t get hold of  them e.g. flowers or fruit depending on the time of the year). These native plants are laid out on a table, and kids with their families have to match which plants are used for which activities in the bush. E.g. Rangiora leaves (Brachiglottis) is used as toilet paper – which as you can imagine the kids love to learn.

Native plant survival challengeWe set up six sets of the same activity to handle large numbers of people.

native plant challenge layout

At the end of the challenge, kids are encouraged to draw a picture of what they would take into the bush, which we then add to a portfolio they leave with us, or take home with them.

Kids and parents alike love learning about how useful native plants are, and always enjoy this activity as a family. It’s simple, cheap (we created the cards once and use them repeatedly) and a wonderful way to enthuse visitors about plants.

Posted in Botanic Garden, Interpretation

Who Did That? Children’s Trail

Who did that intro signHungry caterpillar signTree spinning wheel_Page_1

There are many facets to a botanic gardens. Visitors enjoy the beauty and tranquillity of the outdoor space and engaging with the plant displays. Children like to explore for plants and animals that inhabit a garden.

To cater for a child’s inquisitive mind the Australian National Botanic Gardens has recently opened a children’s trails – Who Did That? The trail uses animal models and interactive signage to explore the relationship between animals and plants.

The trail was developed by Gardens’ Visitor Services Ranger Katy Penman and features beautiful artwork and poetry created by Katy. Examples of Katy’s artwork and words can be seen in accompanying images. The use of original artwork is a highlight of this trail.

We hope you get the chance to enjoy the Who Did That? children’s trail.